Walking at Shepherd Meadows and River Blackwater, Sandhurst

We went walking at Shepherd Meadows and River Blackwater, Sandhurst on a sunny summer Sunday afternoon. It was such a delightful place to walk. 
The walk at Shepherd Meadows is linked at one end to neighbouring Sandhurst Memorial Park to the south of Sandhurst. 

Where did we walk?

From the car park (see postcode at the bottom of this post) we walked over a playing field until we met the River Blackwater. We then found a bridge where people were feeding the ducks, that were swimming in the river (so don’t forget to take some bread) as you might have the opportunity to feed them. We then headed to the left through a gate and followed the river down stream.

Field by car park at Shepherd Meadow
Ducks on the River Blackwater

There were cows in the field we walked through and the river was quaint and full of fresh water life from reeds to fish. We also saw lots of butterflies throughout the walk. It was lovely to follow the river as it meandered through the 40 hectares (100 acres) site which is made up of wet meadows and woodlands. We followed the river down to another larger bridge, then cut across to wonderful large open field to head back to the car, crossing a boardwalk and a couple more bridges. Shepherd Meadows is part of the Black Valley Site which is of Special Scientific Interest. 

Cows on our walk in Sandhurst
River Blackwater
Is the walk buggy friendly?

We did the walk with our off road buggy. It was flat, obviously slightly more rugged terrain through some of the fields but fine when dry weather. There were a couple of gate ways, and there was only one which had a ‘kissing gate’ which was not wide enough for the buggy so we had a lift it over towards the end of the walk, this wasn’t ideal but we managed.

Footpath at Shepherd Meadow
Bridge at Shepherd Meadow

The walk we took was quite a long walk (for little legs), we were out for a good hour (stopping to look at the water several times!) We are lucky as our eldest is used to good length walks but if you have a more reluctant walker you might want to take a different route or turn back on yourself. To be honest my eldest could have spent hours watching the river, which had amazing shadows from the sunlight shining through the trees. 

River shadow
Walking to Sandhurst Memorial Park from Shepherd Meadows

If we had carried on following the river we would have eventually got to Sandhurst Memorial Park. Apart from thinking the walk might have been a little too far, we didn’t take this option as the park was closed due to Covid-19. I believe it is now open to the public. 

Sandhurst Memorial Park is a 28 hectare (69 acre) site that is a premier location for recreation in the borough.

Take a map

I highly recommend you taking a map with you or accessing it on your phone. There is not loads of signage and we didn’t see a map on site. Here is a useful map and leaflet about the walk. 

We are planning to return to go walking at Shepherd Meadows and River Blackwater, Sandhurst again and this time will take a picnic to enjoy next to the river. 

Field in Sandhurst

When we visited it was quite a popular walk with other families but were able to social distance as the paths were wide and open. On the thinner bridges we would just be respectful of others and wait our turn to cross. 

Where can you park?

We parked in a small free car park at Marshall Way in GU47 0FJ. 
You can find Sandhurst Memorial Park off Yorktown Road (A321) GU47 9BJ. 
A small car park can be used to access Shepherd Meadows from Marshall Way in GU47 0FJ.

What else do I need to know?

I didn’t seen any picnic benches (just the odd bench) so take a picnic blanket if you are going for an picnic. There are also no toilets or catering facilities at Shepherd Meadows. There are however toilets and refreshments at Sandhurst Memorial Park. 

Why not have a read about the other family friendly walks we have discovered or buggy friendly walks in Berkshire and the surrounding areas?

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